If you suffer from anxiety, you’ll know how difficult it can be to try and describe how it feels. For many people, it will include experiencing intense physical feelings, and sometimes unable to pinpoint where the physical sensations are in your body.
Use these resources to help you better understand what your experience of anxiety is. Imagine you are describing it to someone who is unaware of how someone feels living with anxiety. Remember, the more we know about ourselves, the better we will be at addressing the issues that affect us negatively.
Where do you feel the physical sensations of anxiety in your body? Are the pains in your chest, perhaps get headaches or tingling in your hands?

Use the silhouette image below to pinpoint where you feel the pains.

 

Anxiety feels like …………………………………………………………………………………
It makes we want to …………………………………………………………………………..
I feel scared because…………………………………………………………………………….
Because of anxiety, I avoid …………………………………………………………………
Anxiety takes my attention away from……………………………………………….
If you didn’t experience anxiety, what would you do? Think about all of those times you’ve avoided social gatherings or visiting places you’ve always wanted to go or doing the things you wanted to do.
Think about how much time you’ve spent giving yourself to anxiety. Have you ever thought about the number of hours anxiety has taken away from you?

Why Do I Feel Anxious?
It is important to remember that anxiety is something we all experience, from time to time. It is an entirely regular part of living. In fact, it keeps us safe and alert, so in that sense, it is essential for our well-being. Only you will know if anxiety affects you to such a degree that it is problematic and causes you undue distress.

Self Assessment
Completing a self-assessment of how much anxiety is present in your life and what you can do to eliminate it.
Ask yourself:

Has anxiety kept you awake?
• Has it stopped you from doing something you’ve always wanted to do?
• Have you avoided meeting up with friends or joining in social gatherings?
• Has it affected on your performance in the workplace?
• Has it impacted on those people closest to you, in some way?
• Is anxiety becoming a more frequent visitor in your life?

Answering these questions will help you to decide if anxiety is indeed a problem for you. It may be that you recognize the signs of anxiety creeping into areas of your life that it never used to be a problem.

All of this information will make a good starting point on your journey to conquering excessive, undue, and unwanted anxiety. Should you be concerned about the level of your anxiety, don’t sit on it and do nothing, because it will start to affect you physically and mentally. Either seek the help of a life coach, therapist or counsellor and if the anxiety level is high you should consult your doctor.

© Life Coach You